Forbidden fruit: human settlement and abundant fruit create an ecological trap for an apex omnivore

@article{Lamb2017ForbiddenFH,
  title={Forbidden fruit: human settlement and abundant fruit create an ecological trap for an apex omnivore},
  author={Clayton T. Lamb and Garth Mowat and Bruce Mclellan and Scott E. Nielsen and Stan Boutin},
  journal={Journal of Animal Ecology},
  year={2017},
  volume={86},
  pages={55–65}
}
Habitat choice is an evolutionary product of animals experiencing increased fitness when preferentially occupying high-quality habitat. However, an ecological trap (ET) can occur when an animal is presented with novel conditions and the animal's assessment of habitat quality is poorly matched to its resulting fitness. We tested for an ET for grizzly (brown) bears using demographic and movement data collected in an area with rich food resources and concentrated human settlement. We derived… 
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