Foraging-habitat selection by bats at an urban–rural interface: comparison between a successful and a less successful species

@article{Duchamp2004ForaginghabitatSB,
  title={Foraging-habitat selection by bats at an urban–rural interface: comparison between a successful and a less successful species},
  author={Joseph Duchamp and D. W. Sparks and J. Whitaker},
  journal={Canadian Journal of Zoology},
  year={2004},
  volume={82},
  pages={1157-1164}
}
We compared habitat use of two sympatric species of bat in a rural area undergoing suburban development. The two species are similar in diet and foraging-habitat use but differ in current roosting habitat, and exhibit contrasting regional population trends. Evening bat, Nycticeius humeralis (Rafinesque, 1818), populations are declining in central Indiana, whereas big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus (Beauvois, 1796), populations are increasing. We assessed habitat selection by 22 adult female bats… Expand

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