Foraging distance in Bombus terrestris L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

@article{Wolf2011ForagingDI,
  title={Foraging distance in Bombus terrestris L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae)},
  author={S. Wolf and R. Moritz},
  journal={Apidologie},
  year={2011},
  volume={39},
  pages={419-427}
}
A major determinant of bumblebees pollination efficiency is the distance of pollen dispersal, which depends on the foraging distance of workers. We employ a transect setting, controlling for both forage and nest location, to assess the foraging distance of Bombus terrestris workers and the influence of environmental factors on foraging frequency over distance. The mean foraging distance of B. terrestris workers was 267.2 m ± 180.3 m (max. 800 m). Nearly 40% of the workers foraged within 100 m… Expand

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