Foraging behaviour of wild rats (Rattus norvegicus) towards new foods and bait containers

@article{Inglis1996ForagingBO,
  title={Foraging behaviour of wild rats (Rattus norvegicus) towards new foods and bait containers},
  author={I. Inglis and D. S. Shepherd and Peter Smith and P. Haynes and D. S. Bull and D. Cowan and D. Whitehead},
  journal={Applied Animal Behaviour Science},
  year={1996},
  volume={47},
  pages={175-190}
}
Abstract Groups of wild rats (Rattus norvegicus) were housed in large arenas and their foraging behaviour towards unfamiliar food, novel food and novel food containers was monitored using remote sensing equipment. Three main findings resulted from the study. There is a large individual variation in the responses to new foods and food containers placed in the home range. There is a clear sex difference in that, although males and females take approximately the same weight of food over a 24 h… Expand
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