Foraging behaviour and sexual segregation in bighorn sheep

@article{Ruckstuhl1998ForagingBA,
  title={Foraging behaviour and sexual segregation in bighorn sheep},
  author={Kathreen E. Ruckstuhl},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1998},
  volume={56},
  pages={99-106}
}
Like many sexually dimorphic ungulates, bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis, form sexually segregated groups. Nursery groups include females, lambs and subadult males, while adult males form bachelor groups. Previous hypotheses to account for sexual segregation in ungulates have suggested sexual differences in energy requirements, predation risk and social preferences. I tested the hypothesis that differing nutritional demands, due to sexual dimorphism in body size, would lead to different movement… 

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