For the law, neuroscience changes nothing and everything.

@article{Greene2004ForTL,
  title={For the law, neuroscience changes nothing and everything.},
  author={Joshua Greene and Jonathan Cohen},
  journal={Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={359 1451},
  pages={1775-85}
}
The rapidly growing field of cognitive neuroscience holds the promise of explaining the operations of the mind in terms of the physical operations of the brain. Some suggest that our emerging understanding of the physical causes of human (mis)behaviour will have a transformative effect on the law. Others argue that new neuroscience will provide only new details and that existing legal doctrine can accommodate whatever new information neuroscience will provide. We argue that neuroscience will… CONTINUE READING
Highly Influential
This paper has highly influenced 13 other papers. REVIEW HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL CITATIONS

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 114 extracted citations

Debates About Neuroethics

Advances in Neuroethics • 2017
View 5 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Responsibility and punishment: whose mind? A response.

Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences • 2004
View 5 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 20 references

Impaired spontaneous anthropomorphizing despite intact perception and social knowledge.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America • 2004
View 2 Excerpts

Evalu - ation of criminal responsibility

A. M. Goldstein, S. J. Morse, D. L. Shapiro
Forensic psychology • 2003
View 2 Excerpts

The evolution of altruistic punishment.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America • 2003
View 1 Excerpt

The neural basis of economic decision - making in the ultimatum game

R. Saxe, S. Carey, N. Kanwisher
Science • 2003

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…