For and Against Methodologies: Some Perspectives on Recent Causal and Statistical Inference Debates

@article{Greenland2017ForAA,
  title={For and Against Methodologies: Some Perspectives on Recent Causal and Statistical Inference Debates},
  author={Sander Greenland},
  journal={European Journal of Epidemiology},
  year={2017},
  volume={32},
  pages={3-20}
}
  • S. Greenland
  • Published 20 February 2017
  • Medicine
  • European Journal of Epidemiology
I present an overview of two methods controversies that are central to analysis and inference: That surrounding causal modeling as reflected in the “causal inference” movement, and that surrounding null bias in statistical methods as applied to causal questions. Human factors have expanded what might otherwise have been narrow technical discussions into broad philosophical debates. There seem to be misconceptions about the requirements and capabilities of formal methods, especially in notions… Expand
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