For Working-Age Cancer Survivors, Medical Debt And Bankruptcy Create Financial Hardships.

@article{Banegas2016ForWC,
  title={For Working-Age Cancer Survivors, Medical Debt And Bankruptcy Create Financial Hardships.},
  author={Matthew P. Banegas and Gery P. Guy and Janet S. de Moor and Donatus U. Ekwueme and Katherine S. Virgo and Erin E. Kent and Stephanie A Nutt and Zhiyuan Zheng and Ruth Rechis and K. Robin Yabroff},
  journal={Health affairs},
  year={2016},
  volume={35 1},
  pages={
          54-61
        }
}
The rising medical costs associated with cancer have led to considerable financial hardship for patients and their families in the United States. Using data from the LIVESTRONG 2012 survey of 4,719 cancer survivors ages 18-64, we examined the proportions of survivors who reported going into debt or filing for bankruptcy as a result of cancer, as well as the amount of debt incurred. Approximately one-third of the survivors had gone into debt, and 3 percent had filed for bankruptcy. Of those who… 

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...

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