Food stress causes differential survival of socially parasitic caterpillars of Maculinea rebeli integrated in colonies of host and non‐host Myrmica ant species

@article{Elmes2004FoodSC,
  title={Food stress causes differential survival of socially parasitic caterpillars of Maculinea rebeli integrated in colonies of host and non‐host Myrmica ant species},
  author={G. W. Elmes and Judith C. Wardlaw and Karsten Sch{\"o}nrogge and James A Thomas and R. T. Clarke},
  journal={Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata},
  year={2004},
  volume={110}
}
Final instar larvae of Maculinea rebeli Hirschke (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) are social parasites of Myrmica Latreille (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) nests. In the populations of the southern French Alps and Spanish Pyrenees, >95% adult M. rebeli emerge from colonies of Myrmica schencki Emery, despite >60% caterpillars being adopted by other Myrmica species (non‐hosts). However, in laboratory culture caterpillars can be reared successfully by many of the non‐host species. This contradiction, which has… 
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The results of laboratory experiments confirmed the importance of sucrose in the diet of Myrmica, and showed that M. rebeli caterpillars which eat ant brood to supplement their normal trophallactic feeding by workers develop more quickly, but have the same survival and pupal weights – as caterpillar that are fed solely by worker ants.
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