Food shortage influences sibling aggression in the blue-footed booby

@article{Drummond1989FoodSI,
  title={Food shortage influences sibling aggression in the blue-footed booby},
  author={Hugh Drummond and Cecilia Garcia Chavelas},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1989},
  volume={37},
  pages={806-819}
}
Hormonal Correlates of Dominance and Starvation‐induced Aggression in Chicks of the Blue‐footed Booby
TLDR
It is suggested that corticosterone could alter responsiveness of nestling blue-footed boobies to external stimuli, resulting in more aggression by dominants and greater readiness of subordinates to submit.
The function of hatching asynchrony in the blue-footed booby
TLDR
The results suggest that natural asynchrony makes brood reduction more efficient and decreases the costs of sibling aggression to parents, in terms of their future survival or fecundity, as proposed by Mock and Ploger (1987).
The Role of Brood Size in Regulating Egret Sibling Aggression
TLDR
It is proposed that species probably do best by relying on current food amount for the truncation of sibling fighting whenever that cue allows an accurate assessment of pending competition, with brood size used mainly as an alternative or backup system.
Scramble feeding in jackass penguins: within-brood food distribution and the maintenance of sibling asymmetries
TLDR
Sibling asymmetries in asynchronously hatching jackass penguin broods allow more efficient resource use than in artificially synchronized broods, and A-chicks maintain their weight and competitive advantage, without risking B-chick starvation when food supplies are adequate for both siblings.
Dynamics of sibling aggression of a cichlid fish in Lake Tanganyika
TLDR
Investigation of sibling aggression in the cichlid Neolamprologus furcifer in Lake Tanganyika, Zambia indicates that food availability affects sibling aggression of animals that do not exhibit parental provisioning.
Effects of short-term hunger and competitive asymmetry on facultative aggression in nestling black guillemots Cepphus grylle
TLDR
The results provide the first evidence that short-term food shortage per se acts as an initial trigger for aggression and also show that the aggressive response is complicated by factors associated with hatching and laying order.
Adoption and infanticide in an altricial colonial seabird, the Blue-footed Booby: the roles of nest density, breeding success, and sex-biased behavior
TLDR
The sex with certainty of parenthood was more prone to practice infanticide, presumably to avoid adoption in this species, and the lack of aggressiveness by males might be due to the possibility of paternity.
Parent blue-footed boobies suppress siblicidal behavior of offspring
TLDR
Evidence of post-hatching parental regulation in blue-footed booby broods is consistent with Theory predicts selection for such regulation in siblicidal birds that are likely to experience genetic parent-offspring conflict over the value of subordinant nestlings.
Costs of growing up as a subordinate sibling are passed to the next generation in blue‐footed boobies
TLDR
Delayed costs to blue‐footed booby fledglings of junior status in the brood, which involves aggressive subordination, food deprivation and elevated corticosterone, are analysed to indicate that systematic competition‐related differences in developmental conditions of infant siblings can alter their reproductive value by affecting the viability of their eventual offspring.
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TLDR
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