Food plants of the Luo of Siaya district, Kenya

@article{Johns2008FoodPO,
  title={Food plants of the Luo of Siaya district, Kenya},
  author={Timothy Johns and John O. Kokwaro},
  journal={Economic Botany},
  year={2008},
  volume={45},
  pages={103-113}
}
Plants used for food by the Luo-speaking people of Siaya District, Kenya, were surveyed as part of a comprehensive ethnobotanical study. Fifty-two crops were observed under cultivation in the district; 69 species are gathered from the wild. Wild fruits, underground portions, leaves, and fungal fruiting bodies are probably important in Siaya as dietary supplements. These non-cultivated resources, particularly important in the driest areas of the district, warrant evaluation for their role as a… 

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