Food intake regulation in rodents: Y5 or Y1 NPY receptors or both?

@article{Duhault2000FoodIR,
  title={Food intake regulation in rodents: Y5 or Y1 NPY receptors or both?},
  author={J. Duhault and M. Boulanger and S. Chamorro and J. Boutin and O. Della Zuana and E. Douillet and J. Fauch{\`e}re and M. F{\'e}l{\'e}tou and M. Germain and B. Husson and A. M. Vega and P. Renard and F. Tisserand},
  journal={Canadian journal of physiology and pharmacology},
  year={2000},
  volume={78 2},
  pages={
          173-85
        }
}
Neuropeptide Y (NPY), one of the most abundant peptides in rat and human brains, appears to act in the hypothalamus to stimulate feeding. It was first suggested that the NPY Y1 receptor (Y1R) was involved in feeding stimulated by NPY. More recently a novel NPY receptor subtype (Y5R) was identified in rat and human as the NPY feeding receptor subtype. There is, however, no absolute consensus since selective Y1R antagonists also antagonize NPY-induced hyperphagia. Nevertheless, new anti-obesity… Expand
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Results suggest that NPY receptor sites concerned with feeding behavior reside selectively in the mPVN and Y1 and Y5 receptors are either coexpressed or expressed separately in those target neurons that promote appetitive drive. Expand
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Central NPY-Y5 receptors activation plays a major role in fasting-induced pituitary–thyroid axis suppression in adult rat
TLDR
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Appetite suppression based on selective inhibition of NPY receptors
TLDR
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The orexigenic activity of the hypothalamic neuropeptide 26RFa is mediated by the neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin neurons of the arcuate nucleus.
TLDR
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TLDR
The results indicate that the food intake evoked by NPY might be mediated by the Y1 receptor, rather than the Y5 receptor, which may play a key role in the regulation of NPY-induced feeding. Expand
The pharmacology of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor-mediated feeding in rats characterizes better Y5 than Y1, but not Y2 or Y4 subtypes
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A role for the Y5, or possibly Y5 in combination with Y1, but not Y2 or Y4 receptor subtypes in feeding is demonstrated, as well as the existence of an additional, as yet undescribed, NPY feeding receptor. Expand
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It is demonstrated that the Y5R contributes to feeding induced by centrally administered NPY and its analogs, but is not a critical physiological feeding receptor in mice. Expand
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Analysis of the structure of feeding behavior revealed that prepro NPY and Y5 receptor antisense ODNs reduced food intake by inducing decreases in meal size and meal duration analogous to the orexigenic effects of NPY that are mediated by increases in these parameters. Expand
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The expression cloning of a novel Y-type receptor from rat hypothalamus is reported, which is thought to be the postulated 'feeding' receptor and may provide a new method for the study and treatment of obesity and eating disorders. Expand
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TLDR
Cloning by expression of a novel NPY receptor subtype from a rat hypothalamus cDNA library shows that the rat and human Y5 receptors have high affinity for the peptides that elicit feeding and low affinity for nonstimulating peptides, suggesting that it is the NPY feeding receptor sub type. Expand
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TLDR
The data demonstrate that the NPY Y5 receptor subtype plays a role in NPY-induced food intake, but also suggest that, with chronic blockade, counterregulatory mechanisms are induced to restore appetite. Expand
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The effects of NPY on the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure is reviewed and the pharmacological and molecular evidence as to which NPY receptor(s) mediate this effect is discussed. Expand
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