Food groups and risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and heart failure: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies

@article{Bechthold2019FoodGA,
  title={Food groups and risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and heart failure: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies},
  author={Angela Bechthold and Heiner Boeing and Carolina Schwedhelm and Georg Hoffmann and Sven Kn{\"u}ppel and Khalid Iqbal and Stefaan De Henauw and Nathalie Michels and Brecht Devleesschauwer and Sabrina Schlesinger and Lukas Schwingshackl},
  journal={Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition},
  year={2019},
  volume={59},
  pages={1071 - 1090}
}
ABSTRACT Background: Despite growing evidence for food-based dietary patterns' potential to reduce cardiovascular disease risk, knowledge about the amounts of food associated with the greatest change in risk of specific cardiovascular outcomes and about the quality of meta-evidence is limited. Therefore, the aim of this meta-analysis was to synthesize the knowledge about the relation between intake of 12 major food groups (whole grains, refined grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, eggs… 
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