Food chains: Killer in the kelp

@article{Schrope2007FoodCK,
  title={Food chains: Killer in the kelp},
  author={M. Schrope},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2007},
  volume={445},
  pages={703-705}
}
Could a change in the dining habits of orcas crash an ecosystem? Mark Schrope reports on a mystery that reveals how little we know of the oceans. The killer whale (Orcinus orca) is the most widely distributed cetacean species in the world and thanks to starring roles in the movie Free Willy and in marine parks around the world, also the most familiar. But in recent years it has become clear that there is still much to be learned about this complex animal. Or animals: it has been suggested that… Expand
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Whales, Whaling, and Ocean Ecosystems