Food acquisition by common cuckoo chicks in rufous bush robin nests and the advantage of eviction behaviour

@article{MartnGlvez2005FoodAB,
  title={Food acquisition by common cuckoo chicks in rufous bush robin nests and the advantage of eviction behaviour},
  author={David Mart{\'i}n-G{\'a}lvez and Manuel Soler and Juan Jos{\'e} Soler and Manuel Mart{\'i}n-Vivaldi and Jos{\'e} Javier Palomino},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2005},
  volume={70},
  pages={1313-1321}
}

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