Folklore and earthquakes: Native American oral traditions from Cascadia compared with written traditions from Japan

@article{Ludwin2007FolkloreAE,
  title={Folklore and earthquakes: Native American oral traditions from Cascadia compared with written traditions from Japan},
  author={R. S. Ludwin and G. Smits and D. Carver and K. James and C. Jonientz-Trisler and A. D. McMillan and R. Losey and R. Dennis and J. Rasmussen and A. de Los Angeles and D. B{\"u}rge and C. Thrush and J. Clague and J. Bowechop and J. Wray},
  journal={Geological Society, London, Special Publications},
  year={2007},
  volume={273},
  pages={67 - 94}
}
  • R. S. Ludwin, G. Smits, +12 authors J. Wray
  • Published 2007
  • Geology
  • Geological Society, London, Special Publications
  • Abstract This article examines local myth and folklore related to earthquakes, landslides, and tsunamis in oral traditions from Cascadia (part of the northern Pacific coast of North America) and in written traditions from Japan, particularly in the Edo (present-day Tokyo) region. Local folklore corresponds closely to geological evidence and geological events in at least some cases, and the symbolic language of myth and folklore can be a useful supplement to conventional geological evidence for… CONTINUE READING
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