Folklore Studies in English Higher Education: Lost Cause or New Opportunity?

@article{Widdowson2010FolkloreSI,
  title={Folklore Studies in English Higher Education: Lost Cause or New Opportunity?},
  author={J. Widdowson},
  journal={Folklore},
  year={2010},
  volume={121},
  pages={125 - 142}
}
  • J. Widdowson
  • Published 2010
  • History
  • Folklore
  • The study of folklore, founded and developed by British scholars, has struggled to establish itself in the higher education sector in England. An exploration of the reasons behind this anomaly suggests that, far from being a lost cause, there are new opportunities to secure a permanent place for the discipline in the academy and in the public sphere. 
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