Folic Acid Supplementation for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

@article{BibbinsDomingo2017FolicAS,
  title={Folic Acid Supplementation for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement},
  author={Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo and David C. Grossman and Susan J Curry and Karina W. Davidson and John W Epling and Francisco A. R. Garc{\'i}a and Alex R. Kemper and Alex H. Krist and Ann E. Kurth and C. Seth Landefeld and Carol M. Mangione and William R.F. Phillips and Maureen G. Phipps and Michael P Pignone and Michael Silverstein and Chien-Wen Tseng},
  journal={JAMA},
  year={2017},
  volume={317},
  pages={183–189}
}
Importance Neural tube defects are among the most common major congenital anomalies in the United States and may lead to a range of disabilities or death. Daily folic acid supplementation in the periconceptional period can prevent neural tube defects. However, most women do not receive the recommended daily intake of folate from diet alone. Objective To update the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on folic acid supplementation in women of childbearing age. Evidence… 

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