Fluxions, Limits, and Infinite Littlenesse. A Study of Newton's Presentation of the Calculus

@article{Kitcher1973FluxionsLA,
  title={Fluxions, Limits, and Infinite Littlenesse. A Study of Newton's Presentation of the Calculus},
  author={Philip Kitcher},
  journal={Isis},
  year={1973},
  volume={64},
  pages={33 - 49}
}
THE WORK OF ISAAC NEWTON has received a great deal of attention from historians of mathematics. Why then should there be any need for another paper on Newton's calculus? My aim is not to rehearse the familiar account of how Newton developed his theory but rather to cast light on the relations among the concepts that he employed, relations which have not previously been sufficiently explicated. The data from which we begin are straightforward enough. In his early papers Newton followed the style… 
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