Fluvial sediment supply to a mega-delta reduced by shifting tropical-cyclone activity

@article{Darby2016FluvialSS,
  title={Fluvial sediment supply to a mega-delta reduced by shifting tropical-cyclone activity},
  author={Stephen E. Darby and Christopher R. Hackney and Julian Leyland and Matti Kummu and Hannu Lauri and Daniel R. Parsons and James L. Best and Andrew P. Nicholas and R. E. Aalto},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={539},
  pages={276-279}
}
The world’s rivers deliver 19 billion tonnes of sediment to the coastal zone annually, with a considerable fraction being sequestered in large deltas, home to over 500 million people. Most (more than 70 per cent) large deltas are under threat from a combination of rising sea levels, ground surface subsidence and anthropogenic sediment trapping, and a sustainable supply of fluvial sediment is therefore critical to prevent deltas being ‘drowned’ by rising relative sea levels. Here we combine… 
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The world’s deltas are facing a sustainability crisis, with many at high risk of being ‘drowned’ as a result of relative sea-level rise. The only factor that can potentially offset relative sea-level
Observations and scaling of tidal mass transport across the lower Ganges-Brahmaputra delta plain: implications for delta management and sustainability
Abstract. The landscape of southwest Bangladesh, a region constructed primarily by fluvial processes associated with the Ganges and Brahmaputra Rivers, is now maintained almost exclusively by tidal
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