Fluoxetine treatment decreases territorial aggression in a coral reef fish

@article{Perreault2003FluoxetineTD,
  title={Fluoxetine treatment decreases territorial aggression in a coral reef fish},
  author={Heidi A. N. Perreault and Katharine Semsar and John R Godwin},
  journal={Physiology \& Behavior},
  year={2003},
  volume={79},
  pages={719-724}
}
Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter in the regulation of social interactions in many animals. Correlative studies in numerous vertebrate species, including fishes, indicate that aggressive males have lower relative serotonergic activity than less aggressive males. We used fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, to experimentally enhance serotonergic neurotransmission in a territorial coral reef fish and test the role of this neurotransmitter in mediating aggressive behavior… Expand
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