Fluorine Compounds of Xenon and Radon

@article{Chernick1962FluorineCO,
  title={Fluorine Compounds of Xenon and Radon},
  author={Cedric L. Chernick and Howard H. Claassen and Paul R. Fields and Herbert Harvey Hyman and John G. Malm and Winston M. Manning and Max S. Matheson and Lloyd A. Quarterman and Felix Schreiner and Henry Selig and Irving Sheft and Stanley. Siegel and Eric N. Sloth and Lawrence. Stein and Martin H. Studier and James L. Weeks and Mosh{\'e} H. Zirin},
  journal={Science},
  year={1962},
  volume={138},
  pages={136 - 138}
}
Xenon and fluorine combine readily. Xenon tetrafluoride is a colorless crystalline material, stable at room remperature. The existence of at least one other fluoride and two oxyfluorides has been demonstrated. The heaviest "inert gas," radon, also reacts with fluorine, yielding a compound less volatile than xenon tetrafluoride. 
Xenon Tetrafluoride: Fluorine-19 High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Spectrum
The F19 spectrum of XeF4 dissolved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride has been observed at two frequencies, yielding a F19 chemical shift of 175 parts per million to lower field than the solvent and a
Removal of Xenon and Radon from Contaminated Atmospheres with Dioxygenyl Hexafluoroantimonate, O2SbF6
  • L. Stein
  • Environmental Science
    Nature
  • 1973
RADIOACTIVE noble gases, such as 133Xe, 135Xe, 85Kr, and 88Kr, are formed in uranium fission and are released to the atmosphere by nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing plants. Studies of the US
Xenon Tetrafluoride: Heat of Formation
Calorimetric measurements of the heat of reaction of xenon tetrafluoride with aqueous iodide solution give -60 kilocalories per mole for the standard heat of formation, or an average thermochemical
Predicted compounds of radon with acetylene and water.
TLDR
HRnCCH is found to be kinetically stable at room temperature with its lifetime limited by the lifetime of the radioactive Rn atom, and the significance of compound formation of radon with acetylene and water is discussed.
Preparation of Beryllium Fluoride Glasses Containing Xenon(VI) and/or Thallium (I)
The dissolution of CsXeF7 in molten alkali fluoroberyllate glasses between 250° and 500°C is described. The apparent small solubility of Xe(VI) in these ionic glass-forming melts (about 1 to 2 wt% or
Xenon Suboxides Stable under Pressure.
TLDR
It is found that the xenon suboxide Xe3O2 is the first compound to become more stable than the elements, at around P = 75 GPa, and an orthorhombic structure is suggested that comprises extended sheets of square-planar-coordinated xenon atoms connected through bent Xe-O-Xe linkages.
Binding of Xenon to Halogens, to Alkali Metals, and to Itself
THE existence of stable XeF4 and XeF2 molecules has recently been demonstrated1. A description of the binding and molecular geometry using the conventional electron pair model has been proposed2.
Radon Nuclides and Radon Generators
The radon element is the heaviest and the only naturally occurring radioactive noble gas. As a member of uranium and thorium decay chains, it is formed instantaneously and belongs to the naturally
Gas-phase silicon micromachining with xenon difluoride
  • Floy I. Chang, R. Yeh, M. Hecht
  • Engineering
    Photonics West - Micro and Nano Fabricated Electromechanical and Optical Components
  • 1995
Xenon difluoride is a gas phase, room temperature, isotropic silicon etchant with extremely high selectivity to many materials commonly used in microelectromechancial systems, including photoresists,
Chapter 2 Radon Nuclides and Radon Generators
The radon element is the heaviest and the only naturally occurring radioactive noble gas. As a member of uranium and thorium decay chains, it is formed instantaneously and belongs to the naturally
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Errors in viscometry due to surface tension
In viscometers of the Ostwald type used for the determination of kinematic viscosities relative to water, surface tension causes a reduction of the head available and increases the time of flow. The
Viscometry - The Meniscus Resistance in Capillary Flow of Liquids
Experiments first described by Guy Barr in a paper to the Society on surface tension effects in viscometry, relating to the influence of a wetting agent on flow times in standard viscometers have
See for example, Mellor's Modern Inorganic Chemistry
  • 1961