Fluorescent proteins from nonbioluminescent Anthozoa species

@article{Matz1999FluorescentPF,
  title={Fluorescent proteins from nonbioluminescent Anthozoa species},
  author={Mikhail V. Matz and Arkady F. Fradkov and Yulii Aleksandrovich Labas and Aleksandr P. Savitsky and Andrey G. Zaraisky and Mikhail L. Markelov and Sergey A. Lukyanov},
  journal={Nature Biotechnology},
  year={1999},
  volume={17},
  pages={969-973}
}
We have cloned six fluorescent proteins homologous to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria. Two of these have spectral characteristics dramatically different from GFP, emitting at yellow and red wavelengths. All the proteins were isolated from nonbioluminescent reef corals, demonstrating that GFP-like proteins are not always functionally linked to bioluminescence. The new proteins share the same β-can fold first observed in GFP, and this provided a basis for the… 
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The green fluorescent protein.
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  • 1998
In just three years, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria has vaulted from obscurity to become one of the most widely studied and exploited proteins in
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Two green fluorescent proteins, an orange fluorescent protein, and a nonfluorescent red protein isolated from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata are characterized and a type of beta-can that could be formed in a multimerization process is discussed.
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