Fluid, electrolyte, and renal indices of hydration during 11 days of controlled caffeine consumption.

@article{Armstrong2005FluidEA,
  title={Fluid, electrolyte, and renal indices of hydration during 11 days of controlled caffeine consumption.},
  author={Lawrence E. Armstrong and Amy C. Pumerantz and Melissa W. Roti and Daniel Adam Judelson and Greig Watson and Jo{\~a}o C. Dias and Bulent Sokmen and Douglas J. Casa and Carl M. Maresh and Harris R. Lieberman and Mark D. Kellogg},
  journal={International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism},
  year={2005},
  volume={15 3},
  pages={
          252-65
        }
}
This investigation determined if 3 levels of controlled caffeine consumption affected fluid-electrolyte balance and renal function differently. Healthy males (mean +/- standard deviation; age, 21.6 +/- 3.3 y) consumed 3 mg caffeine . kg(-1) . d(-1). on days 1 to 6 (equilibration phase). On days 7 to 11 (treatment phase), subjects consumed either 0 mg (C0; placebo; n= 20), 3 mg (C3; n = 20), or 6 mg (C6; n = 19) caffeine . kg(-1) . d(-1) in capsules, with no other dietary caffeine intake. The… Expand
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