Flower Specialization in a Passively Pollinated Monoecious Fig: A Question of Style and Stigma?

@article{Jousselin2004FlowerSI,
  title={Flower Specialization in a Passively Pollinated Monoecious Fig: A Question of Style and Stigma?},
  author={Emmanuelle Jousselin and Finn Kjellberg and Edward Allen Herre},
  journal={International Journal of Plant Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={165},
  pages={587 - 593}
}
The stability of the mutualism between figs and their pollinator wasps depends on the patterns of seed and wasp production. In Ficus maxima, a passively pollinated monoecious fig, we estimated the correlations among different flower characteristics and determined their relationships with pollination success and pollinator oviposition. Across flowers, stigma length shows an allometric relationship with style length, and style length correlates negatively with style width. Longer‐styled flowers… 
Secondary galling: a novel feeding strategy among ‘non‐pollinating’ fig wasps from Ficus curtipes
TLDR
Fig wasp oviposition site choice and larval biology in figs of an Asian monoecious species, Ficus curtipes Corner, were recorded where two NPFW species oviposit inside the figs, such as the agaonid, indicating that both NPFWs are inquilines under the widely‐used terminology in the fig wasp literature.
The style–length of the female florets and their fate in two dioecious species of Xishuangbanna, China
TLDR
The study suggests that the female floret's fate in these two fig species is mainly dependent on its style–length, but not all, and the stigma shape and the floral organization can both also attribute to their fate in the twofig species studied.
Cost limitation through constrained oviposition site in a plant-pollinator/seed predator mutualism
TLDR
It is indicated that constraining oviposition site through a long corolla tube reduces seed predation costs suffered by the plant without negatively affecting pollination efficiency and, hence may act to limit over-exploitation.
Spatial Stratification of Internally and Externally Non-Pollinating Fig Wasps and Their Effects on Pollinator and Seed Abundance in Ficus burkei
TLDR
A widespread role for non-pollinating fig wasps (NPFW) in contributing to factors preventing host overexploitation in fig-pollinator mutualisms is supported, as well as a general spatial pattern within syconia that enables mutualism persistence.
Mutualism from the inside: coordinated development of plant and insect in an active pollinating fig wasp
TLDR
Study of the larval development of the active pollinating fig wasp, Pegoscapus sp.
Non‐pollinating Fig Wasps Decrease Pollinator and Seed Production in Ficus andicola (Moraceae)
TLDR
It is found that Idarnes reduced pollinator production by almost half but did not reduce seed production, whereas Heterandrium reduced seed production by 40 percent, and marginally affected pollinators production.
Moving Your Sons to Safety: Galls Containing Male Fig Wasps Expand into the Centre of Figs, Away From Enemies
TLDR
The spatial distributions of galled ovules in mature male figs of the dioecious Ficus hirta in Southern China were recorded, finding that male pollinators became located in more central galls than their females, and so were less likely to be attacked.
Host pollination mode and mutualist pollinator presence: net effect of internally ovipositing parasite in the fig–wasp mutualism
TLDR
Results showed that internally ovipositing Diaziella bizarrea cannot effectively pollinate Ficus glaberrima, an actively pollinated monoecious fig tree, and suggest a relatively limited mutualistic role for internally ovIPositing fig wasps from non-pollinator (non-Agaonidae) lineages.
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 51 REFERENCES
The functional implications of active and passive pollination in dioecious figs
TLDR
Comparison of pollination and oviposition process in male and female figs, suggests that stigma shape and function have coevolved with pollination behaviour, in relation to constraints linked with dioecy.
Why do fig wasps actively pollinate monoecious figs?
TLDR
It is shown in an actively pollinated monoecious fig that lack of pollination does not induce fig abortion or affect wasp offspring size but results in smaller numbers of offspring, supporting the hypothesis that active pollination has evolved in fig wasps to ensure that more flowers containing wasp eggs are fertilised as this may increase the chances of successful gall development.
Regulation of seed and pollinator production in the fig-fig wasp mutualism
TLDR
Female agaonine fig wasps enter Ficus fruits (figs), where they pollinate the flowers and oviposit into the ovaries of a proportion of the flowers via their styles, to help maintain the evolutionary stability of the fig-fig wasp mutualism.
MANIPULATION OF FEMALE ARCHITECTURE IN FLOWERS REVEALS A NARROW OPTIMUM FOR POLLEN DEPOSITION
TLDR
Variation in pistil length was associated with a pronounced optimum in pollen deposition, which was attained by only a narrow range of pistil variants of intermediate length, which suggest that stabilizing selection may maintain the architectural invariability of animal-pollinated flowers.
Resource allocation: a conflict in the fig/fig wasp mutualism?
TLDR
Control pollination experiments show that the relative proportion of seeds and pollinator offspring produced depends mainly on the number of foundresses that entered the syconium, and several hypotheses concerning mechanisms that govern the partitioning between seed and wasp production are discussed.
Pollination mode in fig wasps: the predictive power of correlated traits
TLDR
It is shown that mode of pollination can confidently be predicted from fig traits only (anther–to–ovule ratio) or from wasp trait only (presence of coxal combs), and that active pollination remains the predominant mode ofpollination in Ficus.
Coevolution of reproductive characteristics in 12 species of New World figs and their pollinator wasps
TLDR
Data from 12 monoecious species of New World figs and their wasp pollinators indicate that fig fruit size, wasp size, and the number of foundresses that pollinate and lay eggs in any given fruit interact in complex but systematic ways to affect the reproductive success of both the wasps and the figs.
NUMBER AND STRUCTURE OF ANTHERS IN FIG SYCONIA IN RELATION TO BEHAVIOUR OF THE POLLEN VECTORS
TLDR
The complementary nature of the characteristics of the two participants of fig symbiosis is evident, in the context of pollination, because of the great differences occurring in the organization of the androecium of F. carica and F. sycomorus.
Specific Attraction of Fig-Pollinating Wasps: Role of Volatile Compounds Released by Tropical Figs
TLDR
This work investigated the floral scents of four tropical fig species and combined chemical analysis with biological tests of stimulation of insects, finding that pollinators of three species were stimulated by the odor of their associated figspecies and generally not by the aroma of another species.
Egg deposition patterns of fig pollinating wasps: implications for studies on the stability of the mutualism
TLDR
In this study, hypotheses about flower use by pollinating fig wasps were tested by investigating egg deposition patterns in three species and found them to be incompatible with each other.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...