Flower Constancy, Insect Psychology, and Plant Evolution

@article{Chittka1999FlowerCI,
  title={Flower Constancy, Insect Psychology, and Plant Evolution},
  author={L. Chittka and J. Thomson and N. Waser},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={1999},
  volume={86},
  pages={361-377}
}
  • L. Chittka, J. Thomson, N. Waser
  • Published 1999
  • Biology
  • Naturwissenschaften
  • Abstract Individuals of some species of pollinating insects tend to restrict their visits to only a few of the available plant species, in the process bypassing valuable food sources. The question of why this flower constancy exists is a rich and important one with implications for the organization of natural communities of plants, floral evolution, and our understanding of the learning processes involved in finding food. Some scientists have assumed that flower constancy is adaptive per se… CONTINUE READING
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