Floral Mimicry Induced by Mummy-Berry Fungus Exploits Host's Pollinators as Vectors

@article{Batra1985FloralMI,
  title={Floral Mimicry Induced by Mummy-Berry Fungus Exploits Host's Pollinators as Vectors},
  author={Lekh R. Batra and Suzanne W. T. Batra},
  journal={Science},
  year={1985},
  volume={228},
  pages={1011 - 1013}
}
Leaves and shoots of blueberries(Vaccinium spp.) and huckleberries (Gaylussacia sp.) when infected by ascospores of Monilinia spp. become ultraviolet-reflective and fragrant and secrete sugars at their lesions. Insects that normally pollinate these hosts are attracted to the discolored leaves, ingest the sugars, and transmit conidia to their flowers, resulting in sclerotia (mummy-berry) formation. 

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