Flightless ducks, giant mice and pygmy mammoths: Late Quaternary extinctions on California's Channel Islands

@article{Rick2012FlightlessDG,
  title={Flightless ducks, giant mice and pygmy mammoths: Late Quaternary extinctions on California's Channel Islands},
  author={Torben C. Rick and Courtney A. Hofman and Todd J. Braje and Jes{\'u}s E. Maldonado and T. Scott Sillett and Kevin Danchisko and Jon M. Erlandson},
  journal={World Archaeology},
  year={2012},
  volume={44},
  pages={20 - 3}
}
Abstract Explanations for the extinction of Late Quaternary megafauna are heavily debated, ranging from human overkill to climate change, disease and extraterrestrial impacts. Synthesis and analysis of Late Quaternary animal extinctions on California's Channel Islands suggest that, despite supporting Native American populations for some 13,000 years, few mammal, bird or other species are known to have gone extinct during the prehistoric human era, and most of these coexisted with humans for… Expand
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