Flight capabilities of Archaeopteryx

@article{Speakman1994FlightCO,
  title={Flight capabilities of Archaeopteryx},
  author={John R. Speakman and S. C. Thomson},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1994},
  volume={370},
  pages={514-514}
}
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The Vertebrate Integument Volume 2
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References

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FLIGHT CAPABILITIES IN ARCHAEOPTERYX
  • J. Speakman
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1993
TLDR
Sexual selection for sensory exploitation in the frog Physalaemus pustulous and the differential response in animals to stimuli varying within a single dimension is studied. Expand
Functional osteology of the avian wrist and the evolution of flapping flight
The avian wrist is extraordinarily adapted for flight. Its intricate osteology is constructed to perform four very different, but extremely important, flight‐related functions. (1) Throughout theExpand
Feathers of Archaeopteryx: Asymmetric Vanes Indicate Aerodynamic Function
TLDR
Vanes in the primary flight feathers of Archaeopteryx conform to the asymmetric pattern in modern flying birds, suggesting that they evolved in the selective context of flight. Expand
Flight capability and the pectoral girdle of Archaeopteryx
TLDR
It is hoped that the asymmetrical remiges of Archaeopteryx prove that the wing had an aerodynamic function, and it is shown that neither of the preceding points precludes a capacity for powered flight in Archaeoperyx. Expand