Flawed Self-Assessment

@article{Dunning2004FlawedS,
  title={Flawed Self-Assessment},
  author={D. Dunning and C. Heath and J. Suls},
  journal={Psychological Science in the Public Interest},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={106 - 69}
}
Research from numerous corners of psychological inquiry suggests that self-assessments of skill and character are often flawed in substantive and systematic ways. We review empirical findings on the imperfect nature of self-assessment and discuss implications for three real-world domains: health, education, and the workplace. In general, people's self-views hold only a tenuous to modest relationship with their actual behavior and performance. The correlation between self-ratings of skill and… Expand
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