Flavonoid intake and risk of chronic diseases.

@article{Knekt2002FlavonoidIA,
  title={Flavonoid intake and risk of chronic diseases.},
  author={Paul Knekt and Jorma T. Kumpulainen and Ritva J{\"a}rvinen and Harri A. Rissanen and Markku Heli{\"o}vaara and Antti R Reunanen and Timo Hakulinen and Arpo J Aromaa},
  journal={The American journal of clinical nutrition},
  year={2002},
  volume={76 3},
  pages={
          560-8
        }
}
BACKGROUND Flavonoids are effective antioxidants and may protect against several chronic diseases. OBJECTIVE The association between flavonoid intake and risk of several chronic diseases was studied. DESIGN The total dietary intakes of 10 054 men and women during the year preceding the baseline examination were determined with a dietary history method. Flavonoid intakes were estimated, mainly on the basis of the flavonoid concentrations in Finnish foods. The incident cases of the diseases… 
Dietary Flavonoid and Lignan Intake and Mortality in a Spanish Cohort
TLDR
A diet high in flavonoids, particularly in flavanones and flavonols, is associated with a reduction in all-cause mortality, mainly of mortality from CVD.
Dietary flavonoid intake and cardiovascular risk: a population-based cohort study
TLDR
Flavonoid intake was inversely associated with CV risk, CV non-fatal events and all-cause mortality in a cohort with a low consumption of soy, tea and cocoa, which are typically viewed as the foods responsible for flavonoid-related benefits.
Flavonoid intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease in women.
TLDR
Flavonoid intake was not strongly associated with a reduced risk of CVD, and the nonsignificant inverse associations for broccoli, apples, and tea with CVD were not mediated by flavonoids and warrant further study.
Dietary flavonol intake may lower stroke risk in men and women.
TLDR
It is concluded that flavonols may reduce stroke risk in people free of cardiovascular diseases or stroke at baseline and in studies involving at least 2155 nonfatal and fatal cases.
Flavonoid intake and cardiovascular disease mortality: a prospective study in postmenopausal women.
TLDR
Dietary intakes of flavanones, anthocyanidins, and certain foods rich in flavonoids were associated with reduced risk of death due to CHD, CVD, and all causes.
Dietary intake of flavonoids and asthma in adults
TLDR
Dietary intake of catechins, flavonols and flavones was not negatively associated with asthma, asthma severity and chronic sputum production and it is possible that other flavonoids or polyphenols present in apples may explain the protective effect of apples on obstructive lung disease.
Plant foods and the risk of cerebrovascular diseases: a potential protection of fruit consumption
TLDR
In conclusion, the consumption of fruits, especially citrus, and cruciferous vegetables may protect against cerebrovascular diseases.
The Risk of Lung Cancer Related to Dietary Intake of Flavonoids
TLDR
Low flavonoid intake from food may increase lung cancer risk, and an inverse association with total flavone and flavanone intake was observed for squamous cell carcinoma but not adenocarcinoma.
Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of cancer in postmenopausal women: The Iowa Women's Health Study
TLDR
Support is provided for a beneficial effect of flavonoid intake on lung cancer risk, especially among current and past smokers.
Dietary flavonoids intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
BACKGROUND & AIMS Flavonoids may have cardioprotective effects, but epidemiological evidence on the relationship of dietary flavonoids with diabetes has not been systematically assessed. To examine
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TLDR
Of the foods that contributed the most to flavonoids intake in this cohort, only broccoli was strongly associated with reduced risk of CHD death, and the data of this study suggest that flavonoid intake may reduce risk of death from CHD in postmenopausal women.
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TLDR
Results suggest that the intake of apples is related to a decreased risk of thrombotic stroke, and this association apparently is not due to the presence of the antioxidant flavonoid quercetin.
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TLDR
The association between flavonoid intake and lung cancer incidence was not due to the intake of antioxidant vitamins or other potential confounding factors, as adjustment for factors such as smoking and intakes of energy, vitamin E, vitamin C, and beta-carotene did not materially alter the results.
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TLDR
The habitual intake of flavonoids and their major source (tea) may protect against stroke, after adjustment for potential confounders, including antioxidant vitamins.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Intake of Flavonols and Flavones and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Male Smokers
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TLDR
The use of new analytic technology suggests that in the past flavonoid intake has been overestimated fivefold, but on a milligram-per-day basis, the intake of the antioxidant flavonoids still exceeded that of the antioxidants beta-carotene and vitamin E.
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