Flavins secreted by roots of iron-deficient Beta vulgaris enable mining of ferric oxide via reductive mechanisms.

@article{SisTerraza2016FlavinsSB,
  title={Flavins secreted by roots of iron-deficient Beta vulgaris enable mining of ferric oxide via reductive mechanisms.},
  author={Patricia Sis{\'o}-Terraza and Juan Jos{\'e} R{\'i}os and Javier Abad{\'i}a and Anunciaci{\'o}n Abad{\'i}a and Ana {\'A}lvarez-F{\'e}rnandez},
  journal={The New phytologist},
  year={2016},
  volume={209 2},
  pages={733-45}
}
Iron (Fe) is abundant in soils but generally poorly soluble. Plants, with the exception of Graminaceae, take up Fe using an Fe(III)-chelate reductase coupled to an Fe(II) transporter. Whether or not nongraminaceous species can convert scarcely soluble Fe(III) forms into soluble Fe forms has deserved little attention so far. We have used Beta vulgaris, one among the many species whose roots secrete flavins upon Fe deficiency, to study whether or not flavins are involved in Fe acquisition… CONTINUE READING
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