Flagellar and twitching motility are necessary for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

@article{OToole1998FlagellarAT,
  title={Flagellar and twitching motility are necessary for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development},
  author={George A. O’Toole and Roberto Kolter},
  journal={Molecular Microbiology},
  year={1998},
  volume={30}
}
The formation of complex bacterial communities known as biofilms begins with the interaction of planktonic cells with a surface in response to appropriate environmental signals. We report the isolation and characterization of mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 defective in the initiation of biofilm formation on an abiotic surface, polyvinylchloride (PVC) plastic. These mutants are designated surface attachment defective (sad ). Two classes of sad mutants were analysed: (i) mutants defective… 
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