Five Reasons to Consider Phytophthora infestans a Reemerging Pathogen.

@article{Fry2015FiveRT,
  title={Five Reasons to Consider Phytophthora infestans a Reemerging Pathogen.},
  author={William E. Fry and Paul R. J. Birch and Howard S. Judelson and Niklaus J. Gr{\"u}nwald and Giovanna Danies and Kathryne L. Everts and Amanda J. Gevens and Beth K. Gugino and D. A. Johnson and S. B. Nirmal Johnson and Margaret Tuttle McGrath and Kevin L Myers and Jean Beagle Ristaino and Pamela D. Roberts and Gary A. Secor and Christine D. Smart},
  journal={Phytopathology},
  year={2015},
  volume={105 7},
  pages={
          966-81
        }
}
Phytophthora infestans has been a named pathogen for well over 150 years and yet it continues to "emerge", with thousands of articles published each year on it and the late blight disease that it causes. This review explores five attributes of this oomycete pathogen that maintain this constant attention. First, the historical tragedy associated with this disease (Irish potato famine) causes many people to be fascinated with the pathogen. Current technology now enables investigators to answer… 

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