Fits of Political Religion: Stalking Infidelity and the Politics of Moral Reform in Antebellum America

@article{Schlereth2007FitsOP,
  title={Fits of Political Religion: Stalking Infidelity and the Politics of Moral Reform in Antebellum America},
  author={Eric R. Schlereth},
  journal={Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal},
  year={2007},
  volume={5},
  pages={288 - 323}
}
  • Eric R. Schlereth
  • Published 2007
  • Sociology
  • Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal
In the late 1820s evangelical Protestants created Bible, tract, and missionary societies and renewed efforts to suspend Sunday mail delivery. Deistic free enquirers responded by forming their own societies, holding public debates, and publishing newspapers and pamphlets. Evangelical reformers outnumbered free enquirers, a difference far from evident to contemporary observers, who believed instead that "political religion" and "stalking infidelity" were equally powerful cultural developments. By… Expand
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