Fitness of human enteric pathogens on plants and implications for food safety.

@article{Brandl2006FitnessOH,
  title={Fitness of human enteric pathogens on plants and implications for food safety.},
  author={Maria T. Brandl},
  journal={Annual review of phytopathology},
  year={2006},
  volume={44},
  pages={
          367-92
        }
}
  • M. Brandl
  • Published 8 August 2006
  • Biology
  • Annual review of phytopathology
The continuous rise in the number of outbreaks of foodborne illness linked to fresh fruit and vegetables challenges the notion that enteric pathogens are defined mostly by their ability to colonize the intestinal habitat. This review describes the epidemiology of produce-associated outbreaks of foodborne disease and presents recently acquired knowledge about the behavior of enteric pathogens on plants, with an emphasis on Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes… 

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