Fitness Landscapes: An Alternative Theory for the Dominance of Mutation

@article{Manna2011FitnessLA,
  title={Fitness Landscapes: An Alternative Theory for the Dominance of Mutation},
  author={F. Manna and Guillaume Martin and Thomas Lenormand},
  journal={Genetics},
  year={2011},
  volume={189},
  pages={923 - 937}
}
Deleterious mutations tend to be recessive. Several theories, notably those of Fisher (based on selection) and Wright (based on metabolism), have been put forward to explain this pattern. Despite a long-lasting debate, the matter remains unresolved. This debate has focused on the average dominance of mutations. However, we also know very little about the distribution of dominance coefficients among mutations, and about its variation across environments. In this article we present a new approach… 

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