Fission and the Genetic Variance Among Populations: The Changing Demorgraphy of Forked Fungus Beetle Populations

@article{Whitlock1994FissionAT,
  title={Fission and the Genetic Variance Among Populations: The Changing Demorgraphy of Forked Fungus Beetle Populations},
  author={Michael C. Whitlock},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1994},
  volume={143},
  pages={820 - 829}
}
  • M. Whitlock
  • Published 1994
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
Random fission events affect population structure because populations necessarily become smaller at the time of splitting and may remain smaller in future generations, which creates variance in population sizes and a smaller effective population size. When fissioned populations grow rapidly to regain a population size equal to other populations, the standardized genetic variance among populations becomes approximately Fst = (1 + πfis)/(4Nm + 1 + πfis), where πfis is the proportion of… Expand
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