Fish vision: retinal specializations in the eyes of deep-sea teleosts

@article{Collin1996FishVR,
  title={Fish vision: retinal specializations in the eyes of deep-sea teleosts},
  author={Shaun P. Collin and Julian C. Partridge},
  journal={Journal of Fish Biology},
  year={1996},
  volume={49},
  pages={157-174}
}
Although living beyond the penetration limits of sunlight, many deep-sea teleosts possess large eyes, lenses capable of accommodation, and various adaptations for increasing sensitivity and extending their visual field. However, little is known of the extent of the visual field and whether the spatial resolving power of the eye is constant across the retina. In order to examine whether these fish are specialized for acute vision in particular regions of the visual field, retinal wholemounts… 

Figures from this paper

Foveate vision in deep-sea teleosts: a comparison of primary visual and olfactory inputs.
  • S. Collin, D. Lloyd, H. Wagner
  • Biology, Medicine
    Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 2000
TLDR
The marked increase in retinal sampling localized in temporal retina, coupled with a high summation ratio (13:1), suggest that foveal vision optimizes both spatial resolving power and sensitivity in the binocular frontal visual field.
The eyes of deep-sea fish II. Functional morphology of the retina
Three different aspects of the morphological organisation of deep-sea fish retinae are reviewed: First, questions of general cell biological relevance are addressed with respect to the development
The eyes of lanternfishes (Myctophidae, Teleostei): Novel ocular specializations for vision in dim light
TLDR
It is confirmed that myctophids possess several visual adaptations for dim‐light conditions, including enlarged eyes, an aphakic gap, a tapetum lucidum, and a pure rod retina with high densities of long photoreceptors.
The eyes of deep-sea fish I: Lens pigmentation, tapeta and visual pigments
TLDR
This paper summarises the reflective properties of the ocular tapeta often found in deep-sea fish, the pigmentation of their lenses and the absorption characteristics of their visual pigments, and highlights three genera of stomiid dragonfishes, which uniquely produce far red bioluminescence from suborbital photophores.
Dim light vision – Morphological and functional adaptations of the eye of the mormyrid fish, Gnathonemus petersii
TLDR
Optomotor response experiments indicate that motion vision is important for Gnathonemus, narrowing down the search for the functional specialization of the Gnathonian weakly electric fish retina and providing a starting point for work on multisensory integration in these fish.
Retinal specialisations in the dogfish Centroscymnus coelolepis from the Mediterranean deep-sea
The present work attempted to study the importance of vision in Centroscymnuscoelolepis , the most abundant shark in the Mediterranean beyond a depthof 1000 m, by using anatomical and histological
The Organization of the Inner Retina in a Pure-Rod Deep-Sea Fish
TLDR
In the deep-sea eel, the density of dendritic ramification in amacrine and ganglion cells was strongly reduced and may be functionally related to the fact that vision in the deep sea environment relies exclusively on bioluminescence and is represented by burst-like emissions of point sources.
Retinal Ganglion Cell Distribution and Spatial Resolving Power in Deep-Sea Lanternfishes (Myctophidae)
TLDR
The spatial resolving power was calculated to be relatively low (varying from 1.6 to 4.4 cycles per degree), indicating that myctophids may constitute one of the less visually acute groups of deep-sea teleosts.
Seeing in the deep-sea: visual adaptations in lanternfishes
TLDR
The current body of knowledge on the visual system of one of the most abundant and intensely studied groups of mesopelagic fishes: the lanternfish (Myctophidae) is reviewed to discuss how the plasticity, performance and novelty of its visual adaptations, compared with other deep-sea fishes, might have contributed to the diversity and abundance of this family.
Eye Shape and Retinal Topography in Owls (Aves: Strigiformes)
TLDR
In conclusion, eye shape and retinal topography in owls vary among species and this variation is associated with different activity patterns and habitat preferences, thereby supporting similar observations in other vertebrates.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 45 REFERENCES
Visual projection upon the optic tectum in foveate marine teleosts.
TLDR
An absence of bilateral superposition of the binocular fields, wither direct or postsynaptically, was noted at the tectal level, in spite of occasionally observed binocular fixation movements of the eyes, which probably makes possible an independent functioning of monocular fixation mechanisms in these predatory teleosts.
Retinal anatomy in some scopelarchid deep-sea fishes
  • N. A. Locket
  • Biology, Medicine
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences
  • 1971
TLDR
The retinal tapetum is discussed in relation to those in other fishes, particularly those which also have receptor groups, and conclusions are drawn about their functional implications.
Retinal topography in reef teleosts. I. Some species with well-developed areae but poorly-developed streaks.
TLDR
The retinal ganglion cell layer of five species of teleosts has been studied from Nissl-stained whole-mounts and the distribution of neuronal elements determined quantitatively and concentric density contours around an area centralis seem to be associated with enclosed environments.
Quantitative comparison of the limits on visual spatial resolution set by the ganglion cell layer in twelve species of reef teleosts.
A diverse range of retinal specializations are examined in twelve species of reef teleosts and estimates of the spatial resolution of neurons within the ganglion cell layer calculated using
Patterns of rod proliferation in deep-sea fish retinae
TLDR
In a sample of 37 species of deep-sea fish species from the sea floor of the Porcupine Seabight and the Gobal spur, the overall structure of the retina is investigated with special respect for the organization of rods, their length and their arrangement in multiple banks.
Retinal topography in reef teleosts. II. Some species with prominent horizontal streaks and high-density areae.
TLDR
The retinal ganglion cell layer of five species of reef teleosts was studied from Nissl-stained whole-mounts and the distribution of neural elements determined quantitatively and species possessing a marked horizontal streak were found to inhabit open water and perceive their environment with an uninterrupted view of sand-water horizon.
Genesis of rods in teleost fish retina
TLDR
The observations suggest that new rods originate from mitotic divisions of precursor cells which are interspersed among the nuclei of mature rods within the retina, which could explain how the proportion of rods relative to other neurones increases as the retinas of fish grow.
Peak density and distribution of ganglion cells in the retinae of microchiropteran bats: implications for visual acuity.
TLDR
The upper limits of visual acuity were derived on the basis of the assumptions of the sampling theorem of the retinal magnification factors and the number of RGCs per degree of visual angle of several species of microchiropteran (echolocating) bats.
The morphology of the retina and lens of the sandlance, Limnichthyes fasciatus (Creeiidae).
TLDR
A non-spherical lens, previously described only in deep-sea teleosts, was found, and its refractive properties are discussed in relation to the deep pit fovea.
Topography and morphology of retinal ganglion cells in the coral trout Plectropoma leopardus (Serranidae): A retrograde cobaltous‐lysine study
  • S. Collin
  • Biology, Medicine
    The Journal of comparative neurology
  • 1989
The retinal topography of the adult coral trout Plectropoma leopardus (Serranidae, Perciformes) is examined in Nissl‐stained material and confirmed by means of retrograde labelling with cobalt‐lysine
...
1
2
3
4
5
...