Fish recognize and prefer to shoal with poor competitors

@article{Metcalfe1995FishRA,
  title={Fish recognize and prefer to shoal with poor competitors},
  author={Neil B. Metcalfe and B. C. Muirhead Thomson},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1995},
  volume={259},
  pages={207 - 210}
}
  • N. Metcalfe, B. C. Thomson
  • Published 22 February 1995
  • Environmental Science
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
All animals are never equal; even in apparently uniform assemblages such as fish schools, some individuals will be consistently better at acquiring resources or at minimizing their risk of being predated upon, than others. Although many species benefit from foraging in groups, the net pay-off to the individual of joining a group will clearly depend on its composition and foragers should, therefore, be choosy as to which group they join. Here we show for the first time that fish (European… 

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