Fiscal Interactions and the Costs of Controlling Pollution from Electricity

@inproceedings{Parry2004FiscalIA,
  title={Fiscal Interactions and the Costs of Controlling Pollution from Electricity},
  author={Ian W. H. Parry},
  year={2004}
}
This paper quantifies the costs of controlling SO2, carbon, and NOx emissions from power generation, accounting for interactions between environmental policies and the broader fiscal system. We distinguish a dirty technology (coal) that satisfies baseload demand and a clean technology (gas) that is used during peak periods, and we distinguish sectors with and without regulated prices. Estimated emissions control costs are substantially lower than in previous models of fiscal interactions that… CONTINUE READING

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