First synthesize new viruses then regulate their release? The case of the wild rabbit

@article{Angulo2002FirstSN,
  title={First synthesize new viruses then regulate their release? The case of the wild rabbit},
  author={Elena Angulo and Brian Cooke},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2002},
  volume={11}
}
European wild rabbits originated in southwestern Europe but have been introduced into many other countries world‐wide, becoming serious pests in many instances. As a consequence of rabbits being regarded so differently, applied research for their management often has opposing goals, namely their conservation or their control. Furthermore, modern gene technology has led to the concept of using genetically modified myxoma viruses for rabbit management, again with quite contrary aims in mind. In… 
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