First report of a South American short-faced bears' den (Arctotherium angustidens): palaeobiological and palaeoecological implications

@article{Soibelzon2009FirstRO,
  title={First report of a South American short-faced bears' den (Arctotherium angustidens): palaeobiological and palaeoecological implications},
  author={Leopoldo Soibelzon and Lucas H. Pomi and Eduardo P. Tonni and Sergio Rodr{\'i}guez and Alejandro Dondas},
  journal={Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology},
  year={2009},
  volume={33},
  pages={211 - 222}
}
  • L. Soibelzon, L. Pomi, A. Dondas
  • Published 12 August 2009
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology
Here we report the first example of associated short-faced bear fossils from South America. The specimens represent three individuals referable to the Ensenadan (early to middle Pleistocene) species Arctotherium angustidens (Ursidae, Tremarctinae), the giant South American short-faced bear. Although the fossil record of short-faced bears in South America is very rich, they have not previously been recorded in association. These three individuals were found in a cave during quarry exploitation… 
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