First observations on the life cycle and mass eclosion events in a mantis fly (Family Mantispidae) in the subfamily Drepanicinae

@article{Dorey2017FirstOO,
  title={First observations on the life cycle and mass eclosion events in a mantis fly (Family Mantispidae) in the subfamily Drepanicinae},
  author={James B. Dorey and David John Merritt},
  journal={Biodiversity Data Journal},
  year={2017}
}
Abstract Background The Mantispidae are a distinctive group of Neuroptera known for the adults’ possession of raptorial forelegs. There are four recognised, extant subfamilies of Mantispidae: the Mantispinae, Symphrasinae, Calomantispinae and Drepanicinae. The life history and larval behaviour of the subfamily Mantispinae is best known: the immatures are spider egg predators. Among the three remaining subfamilies, larval Symphrasinae and Calomantispinae most likely predate on other small… Expand
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