First evidence of a venom delivery apparatus in extinct mammals

@article{Fox2005FirstEO,
  title={First evidence of a venom delivery apparatus in extinct mammals},
  author={R. C. Fox and C. Scott},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={435},
  pages={1091-1093}
}
Numerous non-mammalian vertebrates have evolved lethal venoms to aid either in securing prey or as protection from predators, but modern mammals that use venoms in these ways are rare, including only the duck-billed platypus (Ornithorhynchus), the Caribbean Solenodon, and a few shrews (Soricidae) (Order Insectivora). Here we report evidence of a venom delivery apparatus in extinct mammals, documented by well-preserved specimens recovered from late Palaeocene rocks in Alberta, Canada. Although… Expand
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