First discovery of a primitive coelacanth fin fills a major gap in the evolution of lobed fins and limbs

@article{Friedman2007FirstDO,
  title={First discovery of a primitive coelacanth fin fills a major gap in the evolution of lobed fins and limbs},
  author={Matt Friedman and Michael I. Coates and Philip S Anderson},
  journal={Evolution \& Development},
  year={2007},
  volume={9}
}
SUMMARY The fossil record provides unique clues about the primitive pattern of lobed fins, the precursors of digit‐bearing limbs. Such information is vital for understanding the evolutionary transition from fish fins to tetrapod limbs, and it guides the choice of model systems for investigating the developmental changes underpinning this event. However, the evolutionary preconditions for tetrapod limbs remain unclear. This uncertainty arises from an outstanding gap in our knowledge of early… Expand
Early evolution of the lungfish pectoral-fin endoskeleton: evidence from the Middle Devonian (Givetian) Pentlandia macroptera
As the closest living relatives of tetrapods, lungfishes are frequently used as extant models for exploring the fin-to-limb transition. These studies have generally given little consideration toExpand
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Ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) constitute approximately half of all living vertebrate species. A stable hypothesis of relationships among major modern lineages has emerged over the past decade,Expand
Development and growth of the pelvic fin in the extant coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae
TLDR
The development of the pelvic fin and girdle in Latimeria chalumnae is described based on 3D reconstructions generated from conventional and X‐ray synchrotron microtomography, as well as MRI acquisitions, and the presence of a trabecular system in the adult is documented. Expand
Endoskeletal structure in Cheirolepis (Osteichthyes, Actinopterygii), An early ray‐finned fish
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The oldest articulated osteichthyan reveals mosaic gnathostome characters
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The discovery of an exceptionally preserved primitive fish from the Ludlow of Yunnan, China, that represents the oldest near-complete gnathostome (jawed vertebrate) offers insights into the origin and early divergence of osteichthyans, and indicates that the minimum date for the actinopterygian–sarcoperygian split was no later than 419 million years ago. Expand
FRONTIERS IN PALAEONTOLOGY THE EARLY EVOLUTION OF RAY-FINNED FISHES
Ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) constitute approximately half of all living vertebrate species. A stable hypothesis of relationships among major modern lineages has emerged over the past decade,Expand
Development and growth of the pelvic fin in the extant coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae.
TLDR
The development of the pelvic fin and girdle in Latimeria chalumnae is described based on 3D reconstructions generated from conventional and X-ray synchrotron microtomography, as well as MRI acquisitions, and the presence of a trabecular system in the adult is documented. Expand
Pectoral girdle and fin anatomy of Gogonasus andrewsae long, 1985: Implications for tetrapodomorph limb evolution
TLDR
A phylogenetic analysis indicates a more stemward position for Gogonasus in a weakly supported clade with other “osteolepidid” taxa, compared to other recent studies placing Gog onasus crownward of osteolespidid fishes and the Tristichopteridae, as the sister taxon to the “Elpistosteglia” + Tetrapoda. Expand
Development and growth of the pectoral girdle and fin skeleton in the extant coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae
TLDR
Latimeria development supports previous interpretations of the asymmetrical pectoral fin skeleton as being plesiomorphic for coelacanths and sarcopterygians. Expand
Reconstructing pectoral appendicular muscle anatomy in fossil fish and tetrapods over the fins‐to‐limbs transition
TLDR
A stepwise sequence of specific appendicular muscle acquisitions, splits, and fusions that led from the ancestral sarcopterygian pectoral fin to the ancestral tetrapod forelimb is postulated, which largely agrees with previous hypotheses based on palaeontological and comparative work, but is much more comprehensive in terms of both muscles and taxa. Expand
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