• Corpus ID: 3236557

First aid normobaric oxygen for the treatment of recreational diving injuries.

@article{Longphre2007FirstAN,
  title={First aid normobaric oxygen for the treatment of recreational diving injuries.},
  author={J M Longphre and P J Denoble and Richard E. Moon and Richard D. Vann and J J Freiberger},
  journal={Undersea \& hyperbaric medicine : journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc},
  year={2007},
  volume={34 1},
  pages={
          43-9
        }
}
INTRODUCTION First aid oxygen (FAO2) has been widely used as an emergency treatment for diving injuries, but there are few studies supporting its efficacy. METHODS 2,231 sequential diving injury reports collected by the Divers Alert Network (DAN) Injury database from 1998 to 2003 were examined. RESULTS 47% (1,045) of cases received FAO2. The median time to FAO2 treatment after surfacing was four hours and after symptom onset was 2.2 hours. Persistent complete relief (14%) or improvement (51… 

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