First Record of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Infecting Four Frog Families from Peninsular Malaysia

@article{Savage2011FirstRO,
  title={First Record of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Infecting Four Frog Families from Peninsular Malaysia},
  author={Anna E Savage and L. Lee Grismer and Shahrul Anuar and Chan Kin Onn and Jesse L. Grismer and Evan S H Quah and Mohd Abdul Muin and Norhayati Ahmad and Melissa A. Lenker and Kelly R. Zamudio},
  journal={EcoHealth},
  year={2011},
  volume={8},
  pages={121-128}
}
The fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) infects amphibians on every continent where they occur and is linked to the decline of over 200 amphibian species worldwide. At present, only three published Bd surveys exist for mainland Asia, and Bd has been detected in South Korea alone. In this article, we report the first survey for Bd in Peninsular Malaysia. We swabbed 127 individuals from the six amphibian families that occur on Peninsular Malaysia, including two orders, 27 genera… Expand
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