First Nest Records of the Boreal Owl Aegolius funereus in Nova Scotia, Canada

@inproceedings{Lauff2009FirstNR,
  title={First Nest Records of the Boreal Owl Aegolius funereus in Nova Scotia, Canada},
  author={R. Lauff},
  year={2009}
}
  • R. Lauff
  • Published 1 December 2009
  • Geography
A nine year search for the first nesting Boreal Owls Aegolius funereus in Nova Scotia, Canada culminated in the discovery of two nests in Cape Breton Highlands National Park of Canada in 2004. In 2005, one nest north of the Park and another nest on mainland Nova Scotia were also found. Nest start dates ranged from 20 March to 3 June over the two years; only the nest with the latest start date failed entirely, the other nests fledged two or three young each. Nests were in boreal forest, with… Expand
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Zoltán Domahidi
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