First Evidence for Slave Rebellion: Enslaved Ant Workers Systematically Kill the Brood of Their Social Parasite Protomognathus americanus

@inproceedings{Achenbach2009FirstEF,
  title={First Evidence for Slave Rebellion: Enslaved Ant Workers Systematically Kill the Brood of Their Social Parasite Protomognathus americanus},
  author={Alexandra Achenbach and S. Foitzik},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2009}
}
  • Alexandra Achenbach, S. Foitzik
  • Published in
    Evolution; international…
    2009
  • Biology, Medicine
  • During the process of coevolution, social parasites have evolved sophisticated strategies to exploit the brood care behavior of their social hosts. Slave-making ant queens invade host colonies and kill or eject all adult host ants. Host workers, which eclose from the remaining brood, are tricked into caring for the parasite brood. Due to their high prevalence and frequent raids, following which stolen host broods are similarly enslaved, slave-making ants exert substantial selection upon their… CONTINUE READING
    42 Citations

    Topics from this paper

    Brood exchange experiments and chemical analyses shed light on slave rebellion in ants
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    Geographic distribution of the anti-parasite trait “slave rebellion”
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    Enslaved ants: not as helpless as they were thought to be
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    • Highly Influenced
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    Do host species evolve a specific response to slave-making ants?
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    Oh sister, where art thou? Spatial population structure and the evolution of an altruistic defence trait
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    Increased host aggression as an induced defense against slave-making ants
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    Social parasites of ant colonies

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